I love you too

Gwyl Arall menu
Broadbean and Dill Hummus
Caws Rhydydelyn and Purslane Salad
Terrine with Pickled Cammomile Peaches

Rice Bowl with Beef or Tofu
and Strawberry Ketchup,  Russian Kale,  Coffee Beets, Creamed Rosemary Courgette

Gooseberry  Pie

Often I get asked what my speciality/favourite cuisine is. And always I forget to answer: the joys of June. The soft whites and pinks of May, the month of expectancy, have made way for the blood red fruits of love. My heart skips a beat when I spot the first real sun ripened strawberries, raspberries and cherries. For me, it is as with these fruits  nature is saying ‘I love you  too’.
Its is the sparkling burst of abundance which I so love about these last weeks. The vegetable boxes which my local farm has started again are overflowing with green leafs and crisp new carrots, potatoes and onions. Tasting a freshly picked cucumber you realise how much flavour is lost with wrapping it in plastic and transporting it.

image

June is the month for haying. The smell of freshly cut grass is loved by so many people I think because it makes them feel right in the middle of summer, when the sunshine is still sparkling. Strawberries in Ginger Ale Jelly are the optimal foodification of this sparkling sunshine in a glass. You could use champagne but I like the extra zing of ginger.

image

Gorfennaf is the Welsh for July, and it means the end of summer. That’s a bit premature I hear you say, are summers in Wales that short? But it harbours a grain of truth. Nights are shortening. From now on summer is ripening, drying out. The next few months are all about harvesting, and conserving the crops for winter. Not long before combines almost cowlike graze the fields of golden grain, and digest it, seperating the wheat from the chaff.
The revitalising sparkle has left summer. It is about maturing now. That is why I like pickles so much. The vinegar adds the bit of zing which got lost. Recipes for the peaches and coffee beets on this weeks menu I found in the very inspiring ‘Smoke and Pickles’ by Edward Lee.

image

Preparing for next weeks Welsh cultural festival Gwyl Arall I talked to Carwyn Jones, who set himself the challenge to live of the land and the sea for a year. While I am jubilating the abundance of vegetable and fruit produce, for Carwyn these are difficult months. There is not much to hunt and fish for. He’s trying hard to catch that shyest of fishes, sea trout. Although there is an element of sport, achieving the catch, it is mostly about becoming one with nature, feeling almost what the trout is doing, and simulating with your ‘fly’ the movement of small fish it is hungry for.

image

If you eat it, you have to be able to kill it, is Carwyns  motto. When you kill an animal for meat, it should be done with respect. That is the word which ressonates with me most. Cooking is not an art, sport or nutritional necessarily action, but paying respect to what nature is giving you. Your way of saying ‘I love you too ‘ to the earth and all what it is providing you with.

Advertisements